Category: roleplay

World of Warcraft has a wide variety of playable races to choose…

World of Warcraft has a wide variety of playable races to choose from. Each race comes with its own quirks — and in some cases, its own particular dialect. This means that voice files for these races have accents that help add to the overall flavor of the race. It also means that roleplayers sometimes feel obligated to use that accent while roleplaying.

But roleplay is a written medium. There aren’t any words actually spoken aloud — so is that accent really necessary? Are any of these racial quirks really necessary? And how do you go about successfully incorporating them into your roleplay?

— Role Play: Accents and other quirks in roleplay

Patch 7.3 has arrived, and with it a new faction — the Grand…

Patch 7.3 has arrived, and with it a new faction — the Grand Army of the Light. While we’ve seen evidence of the Army on Azeroth, only now have we encountered the majority of its forces. Over the course of 7.3, we ally with the Army, becoming members in our own right. Velen once had a vision of a grand united army of all of Azeroth’s races. It looks like that vision is coming to fruition.

As far as roleplay goes, you can choose to incorporate Argus if you like. You can also choose to ignore it, and focus on your character’s life on Azeroth. But there’s a third option here as well. What if you wanted to roleplay a member of that Grand Army? Not a recent addition, but someone who has been with the Army all along? What would that character look like?

Roleplaying a member of the Army of the Light

You might be new to roleplaying, with a brand-new character…

You might be new to roleplaying, with a brand-new character looking for interaction. Or you might be a roleplayer who’s been around for years, whose character has a lengthy and detailed history. But no matter your experience level, you can’t seem to find anyone to roleplay with. Maybe you find a few good prospects, but they never seem to stick around… so now what?

Regardless of your background as a roleplayer, if you can’t find people to roleplay with, the game isn’t much fun. When you’re stuck in a rut with no roleplay in sight, it’s easy to place the blame on others. But sometimes, a little self-reflection is in order — you might be shooting yourself in the foot without even realizing it. Let’s look at some of the reasons people might not be as interested in roleplaying with you as you are with them.

Role Play: Are you sabotaging your roleplay?

Argus is clearly visible in the sky for all players now. We just…

Argus is clearly visible in the sky for all players now. We just had a new 7.3 related scenario drop yesterday. All signs are pointing to the fact that patch 7.3 is nearly upon us — which means roleplayers are about to get a glut of new lore. Interestingly enough, the lead-up for the patch is almost a mini pre-expansion event in and of itself. Despite not having an official release date for 7.3, we know it’s definitely on the way.

For roleplayers, this means it’s time to determine where your characters are during this pivotal part of the expansion. More importantly, you’ll need to determine when they are. And most important of all, you’ll want to consider how these events affect your character. We won’t be talking 7.3 spoilers here, but it’s worth it to take a look at what’s coming up, and what that means in terms of your roleplay.

Plot points for roleplayers headed into patch 7.3

A large portion of roleplaying comes from the creation of a…

A large portion of roleplaying comes from the creation of a compelling character. You want to make a well-rounded character with an interesting background, for any potential exploration into that character’s past. You want to give them good motivation for everything they’re doing in the present. And you want to give them a good reason for moving on into the future, and dealing with future events.

But beyond character development, roleplay is about writing. That’s how you interact with people, and how you tell your stories. One of the common misconceptions with roleplay is that longer replies = better writing. There’s nothing wrong with a lengthy post, but it doesn’t automatically make you an amazing roleplayer. You don’t need to be an award-winning writer to roleplay…and you don’t need to write novels while you roleplay, either.

So how do you know if you’re going overboard? How do you dial back your writing? And when is it acceptable to write paragraphs at a time?

Role Play: The logistics of length in roleplay

So you’d like to roleplay a dragon. Or perhaps you’d like to…

So you’d like to roleplay a dragon. Or perhaps you’d like to play a necromancer who’s lived for thousands of years longer than he should have. Maybe you’d like to take the leap and explore what life would be as a dryad or satyr. Or hey, gnolls seem to be a really fascinating species, and you’d like to try your hand at playing one.

Nothing’s stopping you from doing so. As I said when I started this column, you can roleplay whatever you want. But when you leap so far out of the realm of ordinary roleplay, you’ve got a difficult task ahead. The question of just how far you’ll go is entirely up to you — but roleplay isn’t necessarily about you. So how do you come up with an unconventional character? And how do you roleplay that character, and get other people to participate?

Role Play: Roleplaying the extraordinary

In World of Warcraft, and Legion in particular, the story is all…

In World of Warcraft, and Legion in particular, the story is all about fantasy and heroic deeds. Every expansion, our characters prepare to deal with whatever all-powerful, cosmic villain happens to be threatening their home. They travel to far-off places and experience unusual situations that take them to other worlds, in some cases bending time and reality itself. But what if you want a character that…simply isn’t interested in any of that? 

Role Play: Roleplaying the ordinary

If you have a character, that character has some kind of…

If you have a character, that character has some kind of backstory. Maybe you’ve spent a lot of time working out all the details of your character’s past. Or maybe you just wing it as you go, preferring to focus on your character’s future instead. Regardless, these pieces of backstory tend to affect how your character interacts with others in a variety of situations. We are the sum of all we’ve learned, after all.

But other characters aren’t really aware of where your character is coming from. You character is, in essence, a blank slate to them. Learning about each other is part of that whole roleplaying experience. Sure, a good story is meant to be shared — but how do you effectively tell that story in your roleplay, without giving everything away?

Role Play: Showing vs. telling

Roleplayers are as varied as any other style of player in World…

Roleplayers are as varied as any other style of player in World of Warcraft. The general perception is the same whether you’re looking at PVP, PVE, or roleplay. There’s a “right” way to do things, and a “wrong” way to do things. It’s the definition of what is “right” and what is “wrong” that varies from player to player. Everyone has their own preferences; you see them with addons, with talent selections, and with gear choices.

The same applies to roleplay as well. Everything from speaking in /say vs. speaking in /party all the way to grammar and what tense you choose to write in is up in the air. So let’s just get this out of the way: There is no “right” way to roleplay. Whatever method you’re comfortable with is the one that’s right for you. There are, however, ways to ensure your roleplay is good roleplay, regardless of how you go about it.

Role Play: What makes a “good” roleplay interaction?

You might think of conflict as a negative term — after all, it’s…

You might think of conflict as a negative term — after all, it’s primarily used in situations where things are going wrong. But in storytelling and roleplay, conflict is something that happens every day. Although the nature of that conflict might be unpleasant, conflict itself is nothing to get upset over. In fact, it’s one of the building blocks of character development. Conflict, and how your character responds to it, are what give your character room to grow — or in some cases, regress.

Role Play: Conflict in roleplay